Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery Tokyo, Japan.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Veronique Preat

University of Louvain, Louvain drug research Institute, Belgium

Keynote: Local and targeted delivery of nanomedicines for the treatment of glioblastoma

Time : TBA

NanoDelivery 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Veronique Preat photo
Biography:

Véronique Préat is full professor of pharmaceutics at the Faculty of pharmacy and head of the laboratory of Advanced drug delivery and biomaterials at the Louvain Drug research institute of the University of Louvain. She received a master and PhD in pharmaceutical sciences from this university. Her research area is focused on advanced delivery systems for unmet medical and pharmaceutical needs. In particular, her research on nanomedicines mainly focuses on the oral delivery of lipidic and polymeric nanoparticles loaded with drugs and the intravenous and local delivery of nanomedicines targeting the tumoral endothelium and cancer cells. She also focuses on the delivery of DNA and RNA with a particular interest in vaccination and cancer treatments. She supervised 38 PhD theses. She is author of more than 250 publications and book chapters with a h index 54 and more than 11500 citations. She is a highly cited researcher since 2015.

Abstract:

Glioblastoma (GBM) treatment includes, when possible, surgical resection of the tumor followed by chemoradiotherapy but the survival remains low mainly due to local recurrences. The local and targeted systemic delivery of anticancer drug-loaded nanomedicines to treat GBM after surgical resection of the tumor is a promising strategy. Among the strategies that have been adopted in the last two decades to find new and efficacious therapies for the treatment of GBM, the local delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs in the tumor resection cavity emerged. We developed two formulations of anticancer nanomedicines that can be injected perisurgically in the resection cavity of orthotopic GBM. Both PEG-DMA photopolymerisable hydrogel containing paclitaxel loaded nanoparticles and lauroyl-Gemcitabine lipid nanocapsules that spontaneously form a gel significantly improved the survival of the GBM-bearing mice. Another nanomedicine-based strategy could also improve GBM outcome. Targeted nanotheranostics are promising multifunctional system characterized by nano-size, possibility of surface functionalization, diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities. Due to the loss of BBB integrity in the GBM area, we showed that active targeting or magnetic targeting of SPIO/paclitaxel loaded nanoparticles enhanced the biodistribution of the nanoparticles in the brain and enhanced the survival time of GBM bearing mice after IV administration. The potential of other nanomedicine-based treatments of GBM will be discussed.

 

Keynote Forum

Hiroshi Maeda

Osaka University Medical School ,Japan

Keynote: Drug Delivery to Cancer based on Nano Medicine utilizing EPR effect

Time : TBA

NanoDelivery 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hiroshi Maeda photo
Biography:

Hiroshi Maeda is a world renowned expert in macromolecular therapeutics. He created the world first polymeric-conjugate drug, SMANCS, approved for treatment of hepatoma in Japan. Consequently, he discovered the concept of EPR effect of macromolecular-drugs, ubiquitous mechanism for solid tumor selective targeting of polymeric drugs. He received MS, University of California, Devis, Fulbright student, Ph.D., M.D., Tohoku University. He published more than 450 papers in reputed journals. He was awarded Lifetime-Achievement-Award at Royal-Pharmaceutical-Society, Princess-Takamatsu-Award in Cancer Research, Tomizo-Yoshida-Award, highest award of Japan-Cancer-Assoc., and also selected as most cited influential scientist in pharmacology by Thomson Reuters 2014, and H-index of 89.

Abstract:

History of anticancer agents can be traced back 70 years, and that of photodynamic therapy (PDT), or boron / thermal neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to more than 100 years, or 50 years, respectively.  However, WHO or NCI of USA admit that most of cancer drugs developed were failure of >90%.  A major reason for these failures, is attributed to that there is no general principle to deliver the drugs to cancer tissue until the EPR (enhanced permeability and retention) effect was discovered in 1986 by us.  I will present in this meeting advantages of macromolecular drug or nanomedicine for cancer drug-targeting to tumor based on the EPR effect in solid tumor.  Also, I will talk about the history,  and controversial issues of the EPR effect, including various factors involved, such as heterogeneity, genetic mutational diversity, obstacles to the tumor blood flow or thrombi formation, and counter measures to overcome these problems in the EPR based drug delivery.  Also gaps between experimental models of mice, in contrast to practical human clinical setting, will be discussed.  Issues of cell internalization, which is greatly affected by the nature of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) was demonstrated using HPMA-polymer(P)-conjugated-pirarubicin (THP) and P-doxorubicin (P-DOX), where P-THP was more than 30 fold better than P-DOX.  Critical importance of the enhancers of the EPR effect such as nitroglycerin are also discussed, and brief results of clinical pilot study of P-THP will be presented.

NanoDelivery 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Madhavan Nair photo
Biography:

Madhavan Nair is the Founding Chair and Distinguished Professor of the Department of Immunology at HWCOM, Florida International University. Dr. Nair’s main contribution to science include: a) first to report of reduced NK cell activity in intravenous drug users, b) first to report of immunoregulatory effects of HIV-1 recombinant peptides, c) first to report of differential effects of HIV-1B and C tat protein on secretion of neuropathogenic (IDO) and inflammatory molecules by primary monocytes and astrocytes, d) first report of morphine-induced apoptosis, e) synergistic effects of drug abuse and HIV-1 proteins on various immune responses and f) proteomic profiling of normal human astrocytes treated with cocaine, g) heroin induced differential protein expression by astrocytes h) transmigration of drugs bound nanocarrier across blood brain barrier model and i) the first report of transport and controlled release of HIV drugs bound to novel magneto- electric nanoparticles across BBB.

Abstract:

2014 report suggests that more than 36.9 million people are living with HIV/AIDS in the world today that includes more than 1.2 million people from US. Current studies also show that more than 247 million people are affected with substance abuse in the world that includes more than 24 million Americans. Reports also show that more than 3-4 million people are co-affected with HIV and illicit drug use. Although highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in remarkable decline in the morbidity and mortality in AIDS patients, inadequate delivery of HIV drugs across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to the brain results in HIV persistence. Drugs of abuse such as opiates act synergistically with HIV-1 to potentiate the HIV-related neurotoxicity that leads to development of Neuro-AIDS. In recent years, use of nanotechnology has shown exciting prospect for development of novel drug delivery systems. We herein report the development of a Magneto-Electric Nanocarrier (MEN) to deliver and release on demand of HIV drugs and opiate antagonist, which are otherwise impenetrable to brain and inhibit HIV and reverse opiate mediated adverse neurological effects. The proposed nanocarrier is anticipated to simultaneously reduce Neuro-AIDS and opiate addiction in HIV-1 infected opiate addicts. Further, this invented/patented new technology will have universal applicability for targeting and controlled release of drugs against a variety of other CNS diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, brain tumors etc

Keynote Forum

Arvydas Tamulis

Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy of Vilnius University,Lithuania

Keynote: Possible to Excite Transmission of Nerve Signals in Brain for Cancer Therapy

Time : TBA

NanoDelivery 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Arvydas Tamulis photo
Biography:

Arvydas tamulis has completed his Ph.D. degree of the Theoretical and Mathematical Physics in Vilnius University in 1985.He worked has a Research Fellow at the Institute of Physics of the Lithuanian Academy of Sciences from 1985-1996.At Present he is working as a Senior researcher at the Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University. Total number of scientific publications 228: 5 chapters of books, 117 scientific articles in the refered issues (67 of them in the ISI Web of Science list with the impact factor). Science presentations in more than 100 conferences and symposia in Lithuania, Russia, Poland, England, Wales, Scotland, Germany, Japan, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Italy, Spain, France, Netherlands and USA. During 22 years of restored Lithuanian independancy have sucessfuly participated in 27 scientific projects.

Abstract:

Neutral radical acetylcholine molecule (ACh) play important role in the transmission of peripheral nerve signals and in the processes of the central nervous system which are related with consciousness but also might be employed for the therapy of brain and other nervous system tumors.
Molecular complex containing two ACh molecules and photoactive hypericin molecule (see in the center of Figure) in acetonitrile or in water molecules environments were investigated using quantum mechanical various density functional methods.The neutral radical ACh molecule is not regular, because its nitrogen atom possesses four chemical bonds with carbon atoms (see in the right of Figure), even though it typically forms only 3 single bonds therefore ACh molecule possesses one single unpaired electron spin.
During 2002-2004 years research efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) focused on constructing a quantum computer based on regular arrays build from neutral radical molecules possessing one single unpaired electron spin. The idea was built on the ability to manipulate individual electron spins in some kind of a solid matrix or lattice1-3. It was suggested that self-assembled monolayer systems could be used to create a macroscopic ensemble of quantum entangled 3-spin groups as a first step in quantum information processing4,5. The spins of such a group could be connected by dipole–dipole quantum couplings. Application of a non-uniform external magnetic field could allow selective excitation of every spin inside the group. The proper sequence of resonant electromagnetic pulses would then drive all spin groups into a 3-spin entangled state. In the approach suggested in Ref. [1], the spins were to be associated with a single unpaired electron spin of a neutral radical molecule in the self-assembled monolayer.group could be connected by dipole–dipole quantum couplings. Application of a non-uniform external magnetic field could allow selective excitation of every spin inside the group. The proper sequence of resonant electromagnetic pulses would then drive all spin groups into a 3-spin entangled state. In the approach suggested in Ref. [1], the spins were to be associated with a single unpaired electron spin of a neutral radical molecule in the self-assembled monolayer.
We have found self-assembly of four neurotransmitter ACh molecular complexes in a water molecules environment by using geometry optimization with DFT B97d method. These complexes organizes to regular arrays of ACh molecules possessing electronic spins, i.e. quantum information bits6,7.
These spin arrays could potentially be controlled by the application of a non-uniform external magnetic field and by attaching the molecules to the ACh arrays with proper choosing parameters of g-tensor8,9. The proper sequence of resonant electromagnetic pulses would then drive all the spin groups into the 3-spin entangled state and proceed large scale quantum information bits.
Calculations by using time dependent density functional methods PBE0 and PBEh1PBE with basis set TZVP shows that maximum of excitation by light should be in the region 660-650 nm depending on various molecules environments. That allow to excite transmission of nerve signals in brain or other nervous systems for cancer therapy.

Keynote Forum

Ling Peng

French National Scientific Research Center (CNRS),France

Keynote: Charm of dendrimer nanotechnology for biomedical applications

Time : TBA

NanoDelivery 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ling Peng  photo
Biography:

Ling Peng is a leading expert in developing functional dendrimer nanosystems for drug delivery in biomedical applications. She has successfully established bio-inspired structurally flexible and self-assembling dendrimer nanosystems for drug and nucleic acid delivery. One of the dendrimers developed by her team has been scheduled in clinical trials. Dr Peng has coordinated and participated in different European projects and actively involved in several European CAOST Actions. She is currently a research director at the French National Scientific Research Center (CNRS), and a principle investigator at the Centre Interdisciplinaire de Nanoscience de Marseille (CINaM). Her research team has been labelled by La Ligue contre Le Cancer in France for the period of 2016-2020, and she was awarded for the Prize of Dr and Mrs Henri Labbé by the French Academy of Sciences in 2017.

Abstract:

Nanotechnology is widely expected to bring breakthroughs in specific delivery of the right therapeutic agent to the right patient at the right disease lesion. Dendrimers are ideal nanocarriers for drug delivery by virtue of their uniquely well-defined structures and multivalent cooperativity confined within a nanosized volume per se. We have established bioinspired structurally flexible and self-assembling supramolecular dendrimers for drug delivery.1-6 These dendrimers are excellent nanocarriers for personalized medicine: they are able to form modular, responsive and adaptive nanosystems, and effectively deliver various chemo- and bio-therapeutics as well as imaging agents for precise diagnosis and personalized treatment in various disease’s models. These studies have offered new perspectives in dendrimer nanotechnology based biomedical applications.

Keynote Forum

Michal M. Godlewski,

Warsaw University of Life Sciences WULS-SGGW, Poland

Keynote: New biocompatible oxide nanoparticles as carriers of bioactive compounds through the blood-brain barrier

Time : TBA

NanoDelivery 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Michal M. Godlewski, photo
Biography:

Dr Michal M. Godlewski is currently the Vice-Dean for International Studies at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, WULS-SGGW. He defended the PhD in 2003 and received habilitation in 2015. Currently he manages Cytometric Laboratory of the Department of Physiological Sciences and Laboratory of Nanotechnology and Nanoengineering in the Veterinary Research Centre/Centre for Biomedical Research of the Department of Large Animal Diseases with Clinic. Dr Godlewski is recognized expert in the field of nanoparticle applications for medicine. In his research he collaborates with 20 scientific institutions and 6 business partners. His recent scientific interest relate to the interactions of nanomaterials with living organism and the development of nanoparticles for bio-medical applications. He is author/co-author of 60 papers in the WoS database and over 10 chapters in academic monographies, cited over 500 times. Forty invited talks and 30 national and international prizes and medals for innovation, reflect the relevance of his research.

Abstract:

Blood-brain barrier is major obstacle for drug delivery to the brain. In this study we focused on oxide nanoparticles (NPs) as potential drug carriers. Mice received suspension of Y2O3:Tb:Lectin NPs (10mg/ml; 0.3ml/mouse) via gastric gavage (IG) and were sacrificed after 24h, 48h and 1 week. Control group received equivalent suspension of pure lectin. All protocols were conducted according to EU guidelines and approved by LEC agreement No 44/2012. Following the sacrifice, brain tissue was collected for the analyses under confocal microscope and scanning cytometry. Lectins were chosen as a perfect model substance for the use of NPs as carriers, due to the fact that physiologically they are not absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract.

Control group exhibited extremely low signal for lectin not exceeding background level. In the group which received Y2O3:Tb:Lectin, signal for lectin coincided with NPs red fluorescence in the brain as soon as 24h after IG. Following 48h, the convergence lowered and after 1 week only free lectin were observed in the brain tissue.

In conclusion, oxide NPs proved able to transport bioactive compounds through the blood-brain barrier. After entering brain tissue complexes of nanoparticles and lectin dissolved and free lectin was deposited in the tissue.