Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference and Exhibition on Nanomedicine and Drug Delivery Tokyo, Japan.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Jyh-Ping Chen

Chang Gung University, Taiwan

Keynote: Thermosensitive Magnetoliposome Nanodrugs for Cancer Therapy

Time : TBA

NanoDelivery 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jyh-Ping Chen photo
Biography:

Dr. Jyh-Ping Chen has been a professor in Chemical and Materials Engineering at Chang Gung University since 1997. He is currently a researcher in Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and holds joint appointments as Professor in Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, and Research Center for Food and Cosmetic Safety and Research Center for Chinese Herbal Medicine, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, ROC. He received his BS degree in Chemical Engineering from National Taiwan University in 1981 and PhD in Chemical Engineering from Pennsylvania State University in 1988. Professor Chen has published over 150 papers in SCI journals with more than 3500 citations. He is a guest editor or editorial board member for 13 international journals and a peer reviewer for more than 50 reputed SCI journals. His current research interests include biomaterials, tissue engineering and drug delivery.

Abstract:

Thermosensitive Magnetic Liposomes Were Developed For Controlled Release Of A Thrombolytic Drug And Anticancer Chemical/Gene Drugs For Thrombolysis And Glioma Treatment. As The FDA Has Approved The Application Of Liposome-Encapsulated Anticancer Drugs In Clinical Practice, Magnetic Liposome Formed By Entrapping Iron Oxide Magnetic Nanoparticles (MNP) In Phospholipids Could Be A Safe Platform For Drug Delivery. By Incorporating (Phospholipiddipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, DPPC) With A Melting Temperature (Tm) Slightly Above The Physiological Temperature In The Liposome, The Thermosensitive Magnetic Liposome Was Designed For Controlled Release Of Entrapped Drugs Subject To Temperature Increase From 37 Oc To 43 Oc Or Through A Hyperthermia Effect Induced By An Alternating Magnetic Field (AMF). In Addition, The Co-Entrapped MNP Could Be Used For Magnetic Targeted Delivery Of The Cargo In The Liposome Under The Guidance Of A Magnet. The Temperature-Sensitive Liposomes Were Synthesized From DPPC, Distearolyphosphatidylethanolamine-N-Poly(Ethylene Glycol)2000 (DSPE-PEG2000), Cholesterol (CH) And Bis-Dodecyl Dimethyl Bromide (DDAB). Citric Acid Modified Iron Oxide MNP Were Encapsulated Into The Liposome Along With Anticancer Chemical Drug (Irinotecan, CPT11)/Gene Drug (SLP2 Shrna) To Prepare Thermosensitive Cationic Magnetic Liposome-CPT11-Shrna (TCML-CPT11-Shrna). The Composition Of Phospholipids Was First Optimized Followed By Physicochemical Analysis By DLS, Cryo-TEM, FTIR, TGA, DSC, SQUID, Zeta Potential And XRD. Enhanced Drug Release Was Confirmed By Temperature Change From 37 Oc To 43 Oc Or In The Presence Of An AMF. Furthermore, In Vitro Cell Culture Experiments Confirmed That The Drug Carriers Exhibited No Cytotoxicity Against Fibroblasts And Cancer Cells. The Drug-Loaded Carriers Also Showed Better Therapeutic Effect Toward Killing Cancer Cells Compared With Free Drugs. The Blood Hemolysis Assay Showed Non-Hemolytic Activity, Indicating Good Blood Compatibility. Finally, In Vivo Experiments Using Xenograft Tumor Mouse Model With U87 Human Glioblastoma Cells With Magnetic Guidance And AMF Treatment Demonstrated The Efficacy And Safety Of Treatment Using TCML-CPT11-Shrna.

 

Keynote Forum

Shaoqin Sarah Gong

University of Wisconsin ,USA

Keynote: Unimolecular Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery

Time : TBA

NanoDelivery 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Shaoqin Sarah Gong photo
Biography:

Shaoqin Sarah Gong is a Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and the Wisconsin Institute for Discovery at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Prof. Gong’s research group has developed a series of multifunctional drug/agent nanocarriers including unimolecular micelles, polymer nanocapsules, polymer vesicles, and polymer-functionalized inorganic nanoparticles for targeted drug/agent delivery to treat and monitor various major health threats including cancers, vascular disorders, and eye diseases. She has co-authored over 140 peer-reviewed journal articles and more than 130 conference papers. Her H-index is 49. She is an editorial board member for several journals including Biomaterials, Theranostics, Biofabrication, and Nano­theranostics. She also served as an Associate Editor for Biomaterials and is the winner of a number of awards including the NSF CAREER Award and NIH Career Development Award

Abstract:

Drug nanocarriers have received increased attention because they can greatly enhance the therapeutic efficacies of drug payloads. Conventional polymer micelles, formed by the self-assembly of multiple linear block copolymers, are one of the most widely studied drug nanocarriers. However, one major concern with these conventional polymer micelles is their poor in vivo stability due to the dynamic nature of the self-assembly process. Premature rupture of these drug nanocarriers during circulation can cause a burst release of payloads into the bloodstream, which can lead to potential systemic toxicity and surrender their targeting and/or imaging abilities, thereby largely limiting their in vivo applications. Unimolecular micelles — formed by single/individual multi-arm star amphiphilic block copolymers — have been investigated to overcome this drawback. Because of their covalent nature and unique chemical structure, properly engineered unimolecular micelles can possess excellent in vivo stability (Figure 1). Moreover, due to their excellent chemical versatility, these unique unimolecular micelles can be tailored with different targeting ligands (e.g., small molecules, peptides, antibodies, nanobodies, or aptamers) and/or imaging probes (e.g., fluorophores, radioisotopes, or MRI contrast agents) to achieve multifunctionality. In particular, we have successfully developed a series of multifunctional unimolecular micelle platforms for targeted cancer (e.g., breast cancer and neuroendocrine cancer) theranostics. We have also engineered unique unimolecular micelles to treat glaucoma as well as vascular diseases (e.g., intimal hyperplasia attenuation) in a targeted manner. Moreover, other than small drug molecules, siRNA, peptides, and small proteins have also been successfully delivered via unimolecular nanoparticles through electrostatic interactions. In summary, unimolecular nanoparticles are a promising drug nanocarrier that warrants further investigation for a broader range of potential applications